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Psychological Treatments for the World: Lessons from Low- and Middle-Income Countries

A recent systematic review and metanalysis reported that psychological treatments for common mental disorders in a range of primary care settings in LMIC, and delivered by non-specialist providers, had moderate to strong effects in reducing the burden of these disorders. Notably, 12 out of the 27 eligible randomized controlled trials took place in maternal or reproductive service settings. 

A key finding relates to the analsysis of ‘nonspecific’ therapeutic elements, called ‘engagement elements’ which includes collaboration, empathy, active listening, normalization, Involving significant other/family. These elements predicted trial effectiveness independently of and comparably to specific elements, e.g. interpersonal, cognitive and behavioural (Singla et al. 2017). This provides critical support to PMHP’s hypothesis that maternity care staff may meaningfully employ empathic engagement skills to reduce the effects of common mental disorders in their clients.

Find this and more relevant research here: http://pmhp.za.org/resources/for-researchers/

Integrating mental health care into maternal and infant care can help low-income families

Integrating therapy, other services, or information into routine visits can make getting help easier and chip away at the stigma regarding postpartum depression.

Photo: Shuttershock Image: Shuttershock

Unlike the “baby blues,” which are commonly associated with mild feelings of worry and fatigue after having a baby, postpartum depression is a mood disorder characterized by a broad range of symptoms including anxiety, extreme sadness, and exhaustion.

Source: How Folding Mental Health Services Into Maternal and Infant Care Can Help Low-Income Families – Rewire

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