Blog Archives

International Day of Action For Women’s Health: Ensuring Respectful Maternity Care

Crosspost from Maternal Health Task Force blog by Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

“As we celebrate International Day of Action for Women’s Health on May 28, we reflect on the physical, emotional and psychosocial dimensions of women’s health as well as the reasons to support girls’ and women’s health throughout the lifecycle.

With Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5 calling for an end to all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere, the elimination of all violence against women and girls and universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights by 2030, now is the time to draw attention to the many elements of and impediments to women’s health and rights […]

Read the full blog entry: International Day of Action For Women’s Health: Ensuring Respectful Maternity Care | Maternal Health Task Force

Mental health and new care models – The King’s Fund lessons from the vanguards

Emerging evidence suggests that integrated approaches to mental health can help to support improved performance across the wider health system.

Key findings

  • Knowledge and skills around psychology and mental health are important features of integrated care, whatever the client group.
  • Despite this, the level of priority given to mental health in the development of new models of care has not always been sufficiently high.
  • Some areas report that new models of care have made it easier for local professionals to obtain informal advice from mental health professionals without making a referral, creating a more seamless experience for patients.
  • Working closely with voluntary sector organisations has allowed integrated care teams in some vanguard sites to better support the mental health and wellbeing of people with complex needs.

Policy implications

  • Testing the mental health components of existing vanguard sites must be a central part of the evaluation strategy for the new care models.
  • Other local areas rolling out multispecialty community providers, primary and acute care systems and related care models should go further than the vanguard sites in four key areas:
    • complex needs: enabling local integrated care teams to draw on and incorporate mental health expertise to support people with complex care needs
    • long-term care: equipping primary care teams to address the wide range of mental health needs in general practice (including among people presenting primarily with physical symptoms)
    • urgent care: strengthening mental health support for people using A&E departments and other forms of emergency care
    • whole-population health: placing greater emphasis on promoting positive mental wellbeing in the population, in particular among children and young people, and during and after pregnancy.
  • All sustainability and transformation plans should set out ambitious but credible plans for improving mental health and integrating mental health into new models of care.

Source: The King’s Fund

Perinatal depression and anxiety: Let’s talk about moms and dads in Africa

In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), competing health priorities, civil conflict, and a lack of political will mean that expenditure on mental health is a fraction of that needed to meet the mental health care needs of the population.

For mothers, this treatment gap is most notable in regions where health agendas focus on maternal mortality indicators.

Source: Essentials of Global Mental Health

Who is at risk of perinatal mental health disorder?

Common mental disorders during pregnancy and in the first year after birth are associated with certain risk factors. These include poverty, migration, extreme stress, exposure to violence (domestic, sexual and gender-based), previous history of mental disorders, alcohol and other drug use as well as low social support.

– Migration
– Violence and abuse
– Alcohol and drug use

In South Africa, there is a very high prevalence of adolescent pregnancies with 39% of 15- to 19-year old girls being pregnant at least once. When adolescent mothers suffer from depression, the likelihood of a subsequent teenage pregnancy nearly doubles.

SAsouthAfrica

– Teenage pregnancy
– HIV/AIDS

How to address maternal mental illness among economically disadvantaged parents? 

Integration of services!

Mothers in many settings are using maternal and child health services as well as social services. Thus, detection and access will increase if maternal health screening and services are integrated into these public care platforms.

How to implement a maternal mental health intervention in low-resource settings?

We are sharing our lessons learned in this learning brief. 

We have also developed a Service Development Guidelines which demonstrates how to develop a mental health intervention at your facility, even with limited resources.

Find more free & open access resources for professionals on our website

And what about dads?

Postnatal depression can affect dads too. Find out about common concerns for new dads and discover helpful tips on how they can become more involved. We compiled a leaflet with information that could help you be better prepared for what is happening. The leaflets are available in

EnglishisiXhosa • Afrikaans • French

Women’s voices report on maternal mental health

Women’s Voices – Maternal Mental Health

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), supported by the Maternal Mental Health Alliance (MMHA), have published a survey Women’s Voices – Maternal Mental Health which highlights the urgent need to improve maternal mental health-care.

The survey of over 2,300 women who had given birth in the last five years in the UK, explores their experiences of perinatal mental health problems, engagement with healthcare professionals and the quality of care they received.  It reveals the impact of low rates of specialist referral, long waits, as well as lack of consensus over medication and little support for their partners.

The results present a stark picture of how services are letting down some of the most vulnerable women in our society, and provides key recommendations for healthcare professionals, managers, providers, commissioners and policy-makers.

Key findings

– Women reported experiencing low rates of referral, long waits, regional variation of care, a lack of continuity of care, misunderstanding and stigma

– The mental health of women’s partners is also often neglected by healthcare professionals and services

Source: RCOG survey women’s voices

Download the RCOG survey

Download the RCOG infographic

One in three migrant women from low- and middle-income countries has symptoms of perinatal depression

Migration and perinatal mental health in women from low- and middle-income countries.

In this systematic review and meta-analysis the authors summarising the prevalence, associated factors and interventions for perinatal mental disorders in migrant women from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC).

Even though they found that the prevalence of perinatal depression is very high among migrant women, the data they found was insufficient to assess the burden of anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder or psychosis in this population.

Furthermore the authors stress, that given the adverse consequences of perinatal mental illness on women and their children, further research in low-resource settings is a priority.

Read the abstract in the BJOG – International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaeocology

migrant_women_mental_health

Interested in mental illness among displaced, migrant and refugee women in South Africa? Read our Issue Brief

New PMH Toolkit offers diverse collection of resources

The Royal College of General Practitioners has launched a new
Perinatal Mental Health Toolkit

The resources are designed to support GPs and healthcare professionals to support and deliver the care patients with perinatal mental health conditions need.

Furthermore it contains resources for mothers, fathers and an entire section on family support, self-care and well-being during and after pregnancy. This includes information leaflets for patients, and links to supporting charities and social media groups.

CaringForFuture

This toolkit offers a comprehensive and holistic approach to tackle the stigma of perinatal mental health problems!

Telling the difference: identifying maternal mental disorders 

Pregnancy and giving birth can be a stressful time, and it is common for women to feel down or anxious. In fact, many women feel emotional just after childbirth, and this is commonly known as the ‘baby blues’.

Telling the difference between the normal emotions many women experience after having a baby and symptoms that indicate the start of postpartum depression or other mental health disorders is difficult.

Our Maternal Mental Health Handbook helps to identify signs and symptoms of mental illness, types of mental illness that can occur during the perinatal period and cultural expressions of mental illness and distress.

Chapter3

Read the Maternal Mental Illness chapter here

To explore the entire Maternal Mental Health Handbook check our resource pages here

Urgent action needed to address mental health

Declaration on mental health in Africa

Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan.

Read more @GlobalHealthAct http://ow.ly/yd95K

 global #mentalhealth

Global Mental Health: Addressing the Global Burden of Depression

Symposium on 24. April 2014

at the UCL Institute for Global Health

London

Grand Challenge of Global Health

Depression is one of the world’s leading causes of disability, but according to the World Health Organisation, only a small proportion of those affected have access to treatment, while stigma and misunderstanding are problems everywhere. In this panel discussion, hear how the experience of depression is a global phenomenon – and what we can learn, worldwide, about how to treat it.

Speakers

Professor Michael King, UCL

Professor Vikram Patel, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Jagannath Lamichhane, Principle Co-ordinator of the Movement for Global Mental Health, and Founder of the Nepal Mental Health Foundation

Professor Glyn Lewis, UCL

Palmira Fortunato dos Santos, Ministry of Health, Department of Mental Health, Mozambique

To attend or connect go to the UCL event pages

Essentials of Global Mental Health

The PMHP team has contributed to the newly released

Essentials of Global Mental Health

by Cambridge University Press

In Section 4, Systems of development for special populations you can find Chapter 19

‘Maternal mental health care: refining the components in a South African setting’

by Sally Field, Emily Baron, Ingrid Meintjes, Thandi van Heyningen and Simone Honikman

Book cover

You can read the whole book and the chapter online here

%d bloggers like this: