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Breaking the link between gender-based and intimate partner violence and HIV

Intimate partner violence (IPV) during or before pregnancy is associated with many adverse health outcomes.

Pregnancy-related complications or poor infant health outcomes can arise from direct trauma as well as physiological effects of stress, both of which impact maternal health and fetal growth and development.

Antenatal care can be a key entry point within the health system for many women, particularly in low-resource settings. Interventions to identify violence during pregnancy and offer women support and counselling may reduce the occurrence of violence and mitigate its consequences.

This research will provide much-needed evidence on whether a short counselling intervention delivered by nurses is efficacious and feasible in low-resource settings that have a high prevalence of IPV and HIV.

Source: BMC Health Services ResearchBMC series

Follow the project: BioMed Central

Defeating the enemy within – intimate partner violence in South Africa

Abuse at the hands of one’s partner is rife across the world. And even though South Africa has the highest levels of this type of violence, healthcare providers are not trained to deal with it and it is still regarded as a taboo subject.

Domestic Violence in South Africa Image: Graeme Arendse

In South Africa, shocking statistics reveal that:

– half of all women killed are slain by their intimate partners
– this is the highest femicide rate in the world
– more than 50% of women report experiencing intimate partner violence, often during pregnancy
– 20% of women surveyed in antenatal clinics in Soweto reported sexual violence by an intimate partner
– 68% reported psychological abuse and
– more than a third of girls report having been sexually violated and
– 45% of children have witnessed their mothers being beaten

Now, the World Psychiatric Association has created the first comprehensive position paper and curriculum that can be used by institutes globally to try to combat intimate partner violence.

Simone Honikman, director of the Perinatal Mental Health Project (PMHP) in Cape Town, has hailed the new open-source curriculum, saying it will be very useful in South Africa. “I think this is an excellent resource for capacity building that may be easily adapted for our local setting. Over the years of working with health and social development workers of all types, we at the PMHP, have been struck by the need for improved access to accessible, competency-based training on addressing intimate partner violence and sexual violence.”

Read the full article by Tanya Farber in the Times Live here

 

IPV and HIV a vicious cycle

New Publication: Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy

A Systematic Review of Interventions

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) around the time of pregnancy is a widespread global health problem with many negative consequences. Nevertheless, a lot remains unclear about which interventions are effective and might be adopted in the perinatal care context.

Conclusions and implications: Strong evidence of effective interventions for IPV during the perinatal period is lacking, but some interventions show promising results. Additional large-scale, high-quality research is essential to provide further evidence about the effect of certain interventions and clarify which interventions should be adopted in the perinatal care context.

Published: January 17, 2014

for more details and the full article go to the PLOS ONE blog: here

Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy

Just released: the latest PLOS-one article on

Intimate Partner Violence and Pregnancy: A Systematic Review of Interventions

by An-Sofie Van Parys, Annelien Verhamme, Marleen Temmerman, Hans Verstraelen

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology/International Centre for Reproductive Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium

“Intimate partner violence (IPV) around the time of pregnancy is a widespread global health problem with many negative consequences. Nevertheless, a lot remains unclear about which interventions are effective and might be adopted in the perinatal care context.”

Read the full article here

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