Category Archives: Paternal Mental Health

Perinatal mental health: Fathers – the (mostly) forgotten parent

dads mental healthIntroduction

The importance of parental mental health as a determinant of infant and child outcomes is increasingly acknowledged. Yet, there is limited information regarding paternal mental health during the perinatal period. The aim of this review is to summarise existing clinical research regarding paternal mental health in the perinatal period in various contexts, and its possible impact on infant development.

Results

Men are at increased risk of mental health problems during the transition to fatherhood, as well as during the perinatal period. Paternal mental health during the perinatal period has been shown to impact on their child’s emotional and behavioural development. However, research addressing the needs of fathers with mental illness and the impact of their illness on their infant and family has been limited.

Conclusion

A paradigm shift is required, from a focus on women following childbirth and women with pre-existing psychiatric disorders to a broader family perspective with the focus firmly on parent-infant relationships. This paradigm shift needs to involve greater research into the fathering role and paternal mental illness during the perinatal period, including further studies into risk factors, impact on the family system, and the most appropriate form of intervention and service provision.

The full research review is available on Wiley Online Library

In our resource library, you can find information for future fathers in four different languages

EnglishisiXhosa • Afrikaans • French

Perinatal depression and anxiety: Let’s talk about moms and dads in Africa

In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), competing health priorities, civil conflict, and a lack of political will mean that expenditure on mental health is a fraction of that needed to meet the mental health care needs of the population.

For mothers, this treatment gap is most notable in regions where health agendas focus on maternal mortality indicators.

Source: Essentials of Global Mental Health

Who is at risk of perinatal mental health disorder?

Common mental disorders during pregnancy and in the first year after birth are associated with certain risk factors. These include poverty, migration, extreme stress, exposure to violence (domestic, sexual and gender-based), previous history of mental disorders, alcohol and other drug use as well as low social support.

– Migration
– Violence and abuse
– Alcohol and drug use

In South Africa, there is a very high prevalence of adolescent pregnancies with 39% of 15- to 19-year old girls being pregnant at least once. When adolescent mothers suffer from depression, the likelihood of a subsequent teenage pregnancy nearly doubles.

SAsouthAfrica

– Teenage pregnancy
– HIV/AIDS

How to address maternal mental illness among economically disadvantaged parents? 

Integration of services!

Mothers in many settings are using maternal and child health services as well as social services. Thus, detection and access will increase if maternal health screening and services are integrated into these public care platforms.

How to implement a maternal mental health intervention in low-resource settings?

We are sharing our lessons learned in this learning brief. 

We have also developed a Service Development Guidelines which demonstrates how to develop a mental health intervention at your facility, even with limited resources.

Find more free & open access resources for professionals on our website

And what about dads?

Postnatal depression can affect dads too. Find out about common concerns for new dads and discover helpful tips on how they can become more involved. We compiled a leaflet with information that could help you be better prepared for what is happening. The leaflets are available in

EnglishisiXhosa • Afrikaans • French

Integrating Maternal Mental Health into Maternal and Child Health Programmes

Misconceptions regarding maternal depression are obstacles to the integration of mental health initiatives in Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programmes.

The myths about maternal mental health include the beliefs that: maternal depression is rare, not relevant to MCH programmes, can only be treated by specialists, and its incorporation into MCH programmes is difficult.

Fact is that: Maternal Depression is the second-leading cause of disease burden in women worldwide, following infections and parasitic diseases

In the second article of a five-part series providing a global perspective on integrating mental health, Atif Rahman and colleagues argue that integrating maternal mental health care will help advance maternal and child health.

This can be achieved by collaboration between policy makers in mental health and those in MCH for action that will advance maternal and child health status. And by linking strategies to improve maternal mental health to broader development goals, including poverty reduction and gender empowerment.

 

Source: Grand Challenges: Integrating Maternal Mental Health into Maternal and Child Health Programmes

Domestic violence during pregnancy

Domestic violence is any physical, sexual, psychological or economic abuse that takes place between people who are sharing, or have recently shared a home.

In Africa, there is more violence against women than on any other continent. Three women are killed by their partners in South Africa every day, thats twice as many women than in the United States of America. Violence during pregnancy has negative effects for both the mother and the child. Abused women are more likely to delay getting pregnancy care and to attend fewer antenatal visits.

Our recent research study looked at pregnant women who experience domestic violence in Hanover Park, Cape Town. We looked at the profile of women who reported domestic violence and what factors in their lives were associated with this abuse.

domestic_violence_during_pregnancy

We found that women who were experiencing domestic violence were more likely than those without domestic violence to:

– have a current mental health problem like depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts or behaviours, alcohol or drug abuse

– have had past mental health problems
– have experienced past abuse
– not feel supported by their partner
– not likely feel pleased about being pregnant
– more likely experience food insecurity and not have a job

Out of this study with developed a learning brief which targets any service providers who interact with vulnerable women and children, especially those service providers who work with pregnant women. Such services providers can arise from nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) or civil society organisations and may be healthcare providers or social service providers.
Find this and more on our resources for professionals pages.

Why fathers (and mothers) need paternity leave in South Africa

 On the occasion of the first International Fathers Mental Health Day, 20 June, Wessel Van Den Berg (Sonke Gender Justice) reflects on celebrating the unpaid care work mothers do, and how to encourage the dads who are already sharing the care.

“The recently released 2015 General Household Survey revealed a mixed bag for our children. There was a commendable increase in the number of five-year-olds enrolled in school, but at home the picture isn’t so rosy.

According to the survey, 63% of fathers do not live at home with their biological children. This number has remained more or less the same for the past decade. The fact is that there is a massive gap in father’s presence in children’s lives. And this is a problem.

The most obvious is that this may indicate less financial support provided by fathers to families. But there’s another reason fathers should be encouraged to be present and active in their children’s lives. It allows women and girls to achieve their full potential. That’s right: women and girls.”

father_and_child

Source: Why fathers (and mothers) need paternity leave in South Africa – Sonke Gender Justice

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