Category Archives: Parental Mental Health

Domestic violence during pregnancy

Domestic violence is any physical, sexual, psychological or economic abuse that takes place between people who are sharing, or have recently shared a home.

In Africa, there is more violence against women than on any other continent. Three women are killed by their partners in South Africa every day, thats twice as many women than in the United States of America. Violence during pregnancy has negative effects for both the mother and the child. Abused women are more likely to delay getting pregnancy care and to attend fewer antenatal visits.

Our recent research study looked at pregnant women who experience domestic violence in Hanover Park, Cape Town. We looked at the profile of women who reported domestic violence and what factors in their lives were associated with this abuse.

domestic_violence_during_pregnancy

We found that women who were experiencing domestic violence were more likely than those without domestic violence to:

– have a current mental health problem like depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts or behaviours, alcohol or drug abuse

– have had past mental health problems
– have experienced past abuse
– not feel supported by their partner
– not likely feel pleased about being pregnant
– more likely experience food insecurity and not have a job

Out of this study with developed a learning brief which targets any service providers who interact with vulnerable women and children, especially those service providers who work with pregnant women. Such services providers can arise from nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) or civil society organisations and may be healthcare providers or social service providers.
Find this and more on our resources for professionals pages.

Many reasons to say Thank You

happy holidays from the PMHP

In our last newsletter of the year we’ve thanked you, our supporters, families and friends who believed in the work we do and supported us throughout 2016.

With your donation of expertise and money we were able to care for mothers in need and engage with those providing health and social support for them.

Enjoy this festive season and we are looking forward to an even more exciting 2017 with you!

In this newsletter we are highlighting some of the achievements of the previous two months. Happy reading.

perinatalmentalhealth_news

Impact of maternal depression and anxiety on child development

A number of new studies have found that stress, depression or anxiety during and after pregnancy can have long lasting effects on the development of your child.

We have translated some of those findings into an Issue Brief and added some of our recommendations for evidence based interventions for parents.

maternal mental health care

This Issue Brief outlines not only the risk factors for parents, but also encourages the building of resilience to prevent or lessen the negative impacts for children.

caring for the future

“Caring for mothers and fathers – is caring for the future”

Call for Applications: 2017 Academic Year

Exciting news – the MPhil in Infant Mental Health is now up and ready to go.

Please see the advert below for more details.

Mphil Infant Mental Health

Mission impossible? Replacing abuse with empathy

“Cindy* neglected her four children to such an extent that social workers removed the youngest two, both toddlers.

But after Nadia Drotsche, a social worker dealing with Cindy, attended a course on empathic training, she realised that Cindy might be depressed rather than an uncaring and lazy parent.”

abuse during childbirth
Photo: Irin News

Abused in labour, depressed after giving birth – pregnancy can be a nightmare for women. But an inexpensive intervention by the Perinatal Mental Health Project (PMHP) is trying to change this by teaching caregivers to listen, empathise, and identify depression.

Read more in this article by Kerry Cullinan in the Daily Maverick

Depression after Childbirth – a silent killer in India

Our partner – organisation, PRIME, was recently featured on NDTV’s programme Every Life Counts in a news clip zooming in on perinatal depression in India. A full feature will be aired in September.

Perinatal depression continues to be a stigmatised and poorly addressed problem in many low- and middle-income countries. In India it’s no different and the burden of this disease increases every year. Watch the clip below and keep an eye out for the full feature in September.

depression after childbirth

Source: PRIME

New PMH Toolkit offers diverse collection of resources

The Royal College of General Practitioners has launched a new
Perinatal Mental Health Toolkit

The resources are designed to support GPs and healthcare professionals to support and deliver the care patients with perinatal mental health conditions need.

Furthermore it contains resources for mothers, fathers and an entire section on family support, self-care and well-being during and after pregnancy. This includes information leaflets for patients, and links to supporting charities and social media groups.

CaringForFuture

This toolkit offers a comprehensive and holistic approach to tackle the stigma of perinatal mental health problems!

Maternal depression – the nature and scale of the problem

Maternal depression has a number of negative consequences for the woman herself.

These include loss of functioning (inability to perform everyday tasks or social roles), loss of interest in self-care and child care, behaviour that affects other health conditions (for example, poor adherence to antiretroviral treatment for HIV), and risk of suicide or self-harm.

A global systematic review reports that between 5 per cent and 14 per cent of women report suicide ideation during pregnancy or the postnatal period (Lindahl, Pearson and Colpe, 2005). Most suicides happen in the postnatal period (Gentile, 2011) and the presence of perinatal depression predicts suicide (Lindahl, Pearson and Colpe, 2005). Suicide now surpasses maternal mortality as the leading cause of death in girls aged 15-19 years, globally (Petroni, Patel and Patton, 2015).

In this installment of the Health & Education Advice & Resource Team’s (HEART) Reading Pack series, professor Crick Lund summarizes the state of knowledge about maternal depression across cultures.

Suicide is a major contributor to global death rates and a leading cause of maternal deaths

Suicidal ideation during the perinatal period

Mothers’ emotional needs can go undetected during the perinatal period where there is much attention on the baby. We suggest care providers routinely ask questions about suicidality during mental health or physical health screening.

Our recently produced Issue Brief deals with some of the risk factors and unearths some of the myths surrounding suicide during pregnancy.

Suicide during pregnancy - myths

Read this and other Issue Briefs on our website

Ever wondered what is considered a suicidal thought, ideation, or gesture? Than read this Explanation of Suicidal Thinking In Plain Mama English by Postpartum Progress

 

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