Category Archives: Early Childhood Development

New Study examines effects of Maternal Depression on young children

We know a mom who is clinically depressed has a lot of negative outcomes. Those negative outcomes are not just for the mom, they can also have long-term implications for children.

Researchers and clinicians alike have been particularly concerned about the effects of maternal depression during and after pregnancy on children.

Picture: scope stanford medicine

But a new study suggests that a mother’s depression during the preschool years may be more harmful to children than either her prenatal or immediately postnatal depression. It is the first study to track the effects of maternal depression on children from pregnancy until the children turn 5.

Source: New Study Examines Effects Of Maternal Depression On Young Children | Scope Blog

Domestic violence during pregnancy

Domestic violence is any physical, sexual, psychological or economic abuse that takes place between people who are sharing, or have recently shared a home.

In Africa, there is more violence against women than on any other continent. Three women are killed by their partners in South Africa every day, thats twice as many women than in the United States of America. Violence during pregnancy has negative effects for both the mother and the child. Abused women are more likely to delay getting pregnancy care and to attend fewer antenatal visits.

Our recent research study looked at pregnant women who experience domestic violence in Hanover Park, Cape Town. We looked at the profile of women who reported domestic violence and what factors in their lives were associated with this abuse.

domestic_violence_during_pregnancy

We found that women who were experiencing domestic violence were more likely than those without domestic violence to:

– have a current mental health problem like depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts or behaviours, alcohol or drug abuse

– have had past mental health problems
– have experienced past abuse
– not feel supported by their partner
– not likely feel pleased about being pregnant
– more likely experience food insecurity and not have a job

Out of this study with developed a learning brief which targets any service providers who interact with vulnerable women and children, especially those service providers who work with pregnant women. Such services providers can arise from nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) or civil society organisations and may be healthcare providers or social service providers.
Find this and more on our resources for professionals pages.

How can we screen for perinatal depression – globally!

Source: https://womensmentalhealth.org/posts/can-screen-perinatal-depression-developing-world/

While perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMAD) have a global footprint, the majority of research related to this group of illnesses has come largely from more affluent, Westernized countries.  Similarly, the tools used to detect and screen for PMADs were developed and tested in these Westernized countries.

The instrument most commonly used to detect PMADs is the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), which was originally developed in Great Britain.  While it has been translated into many different languages and used in many different countries, it is unclear if these translated versions of the EPDS accurately identify PMAD in disparate, non-English speaking countries.  Specifically there has been concern that simply translating the EPDS may not fully capture the cultural determinants of mood and anxiety disorders.

Asian mother holds her newborn baby

Asian mother holds her newborn baby

Particularly vulnerable to mental health problems are the women who are pregnant or have recently given birth living in resource-constrained, low- and lower-middle-income countries (LALMICs) as defined by the World Bank.  A  recent systematic review appraised formally validated local language versions of the EPDS used in resource-constrained settings (Shrestha et al., 2016).

 

Impact of maternal depression and anxiety on child development

A number of new studies have found that stress, depression or anxiety during and after pregnancy can have long lasting effects on the development of your child.

We have translated some of those findings into an Issue Brief and added some of our recommendations for evidence based interventions for parents.

maternal mental health care

This Issue Brief outlines not only the risk factors for parents, but also encourages the building of resilience to prevent or lessen the negative impacts for children.

caring for the future

“Caring for mothers and fathers – is caring for the future”

Maternal depression and mental health in early childhood

Depression during and after pregnancy is affecting up to one in five women globally.

Previous studies from around the world suggest that depression during and after pregnancy affects the bonding between mother and child and can have direct implications for infant survival and early childhood development.

In this new review, the authors focused mainly on low and middle income countries and are calling for urgent interventions for mothers and children.

There is a substantial lack of research specific to women in poorer countries, where interventions such as cognitive behavioural therapy may not be available

– Prof Vivette Glover, Imperial College London

MMH_screening

Previously, research into perinatal depression has focused on high income countries. But current studies suggest that the problem is more common in low- and middle-income countries, some even suggest that up to 50% of women living in adversity are experiencing depression during or after pregnancy.

Therefor more resources are needed to support expectant and new mothers. Urgent investment is needed in research and the development of appropriate low cost interventions that are specific to these areas.

The Lancet review full text: Maternal depression and mental health in early childhood: an examination of underlying mechanisms in low-income and middle-income countries

Depression after Childbirth – a silent killer in India

Our partner – organisation, PRIME, was recently featured on NDTV’s programme Every Life Counts in a news clip zooming in on perinatal depression in India. A full feature will be aired in September.

Perinatal depression continues to be a stigmatised and poorly addressed problem in many low- and middle-income countries. In India it’s no different and the burden of this disease increases every year. Watch the clip below and keep an eye out for the full feature in September.

depression after childbirth

Source: PRIME

Thinking Healthy manual by @WHO #maternalmentalhealth

‘Thinking Healthy’
A manual for psychosocial management of perinatal depression

This new publication is the first of a new World Health Organization (WHO)​ series on low-intensity psychological interventions.

The manual outlines an evidence-based approach describing how community health workers can reduce prenatal depression through evidence-based cognitive-behavioural techniques recommended by the mhGAP programme.

Find the manual here:
http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/152936/1/WHO_MSD_MER_15.1_eng.pdf?ua=1&ua=1

maternalmentalhealth

Find out more about the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) here:
http://www.who.int/mental_health/mhgap/en/

Fathers and their impact on children’s well-being

This Sunday, 15. June, many countries around the world are celebrating fathers day

 to recognize the contribution that fathers and father figures make to the lives of their children.

To celebrates fatherhood and underline the importance of male parenting we have updated our Leaflets for fathers.

Fathers who play with their children can make an important contribution to their child’s development and growth.

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The leaflets for fathers are available in English   isiXhosa   Afrikaans   French

To find more resources for mothers, health workers or read our learning briefs follow the link to our website

Follow   on Twitter

@ Illustrations by Graeme Arendse

PMHP E-news: launch of campaign site

The Growing Up Campaign

has a new website

Find more details in our latest newsletter below

Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 11.52.51 AM

Also follow the @GUPcampaign under #Child2Youth and add our Twibbon to your Facbook and Twitter avatar.

Growing Up Campaign

Happy #ChildrensDay everyone!

Today marks the official start of The Growing Up Campaign: 16 days of activism following a Child’s Journey from Conception to Adolescence.

This joint awareness campaign hosted by @KidzPositive @CIatUCT @TheParentCentre @PMHPatUCT and @sa_yes

Is an effort to raise awareness for the fundamental building blocks needed to develop, guide and maintain the wellbeing of a healthy child.

All of the organisations involved in GUPcampaign are dedicated to provide services that aims to protect, support, care for and develop parents, care-givers, children and teens to ensure successful growth on the journey to adolescence and beyond.

GUPcampaign

To support the campaign, follow @GUPcampaign on Facebook and Twitter and follow the link to adopt official Twibbon http://twb.ly/1gIs1Yh

Also mention and use official our hashtag @GUPcampaign #Child2Youth

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