16 Days of Activism campaign against gender-based violence – 2015 Theme

Source: http://16dayscwgl.rutgers.edu/2015-campaign/2015-theme

“From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World:

Make Education Safe for All!”

The year 2015 marks the 24th year of the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence Campaign, initiated in 1991 and coordinated by the Center for Women’s Global Leadership. Participation in the Campaign has seen over 5,478 organizations, policymakers, governments, UN agencies and countless individuals from over 180 countries worldwide. Together we have brought attention to issues of racism, sexism, cultures of violence, homophobia and called for the implementation of human rights obligations, including the right to health and reproductive rights, and end to militarism and gender-based violence, among others. The strength and longevity of the Campaign is due to these thousands of participants like you.

The 16 Days Campaign has been used as an organising strategy by individuals and groups around the world to call for the elimination of all forms of violence against women by:

  • Raising awareness about gender-based violence as a human rights issue at the local, national, regional and international levels
  • Strengthening local work around violence against women
  • Establishing a clear link between local and international work to end violence against women -providing a forum in which organisers can develop and share new and effective strategies
  • Demonstrating the solidarity of women around the world organising against violence against women
  • Creating tools to pressure governments to implement promises made to eliminate violence against women

TAKE ACTION KIT FOR THE 16 DAYS OF ACTIVISM AGAINST GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE 2013 IS NOW ONLINE

The 16 Days Take Action Kit for 2015 can be downloaded in PDF or Microsoft Word format. The Kit is available in multiple languages with other languages forthcoming.

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Education is a public good and fundamental human right recognized in Article 26 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and upheld in various international and regional human rights conventions and treaties. Nonetheless, the right to education is subject to political, economic, and social shifts and upheavals, leaving certain groups (especially women, girls, people with disabilities, LGBTQI people, migrants, and indigenous people) particularly vulnerable and liable to being denied this crucial right. Recent data shows that approximately 38 million people are internally displaced worldwide, while 16.7 million are refugees. Girls and young women in particular are most adversely impacted by insecurity and crisis, with the most recent estimates showing that 31 million girls at primary level and 34 million at lower secondary level are not enrolled in school , and 15 million girls and 10 million boys will never see the inside of a classroom. As many as 58 million children of primary school age do not have access to education, with approximately half of these (28.5 million) living in conflict affected areas.

Share your plans!

As November approaches, remember to submit your plans to CWGL for posting to the 2015 International Campaign Calendar to become part of the global 16 Days Campaign movement. The International Campaign Calendar can be found at http://16dayscwgl.rutgers.edu/campaign-calendar.

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The global theme of the 16 Days Campaign will be “From Peace in the Home to Peace in the World: Make Education Safe for All”. This theme recognizes the dire situation for millions of girls and boys, and young women and men, whose universal human right to education is daily impacted or cut short due to violence, lack of resources, and discrimination. It is our obligation to focus on the precarious situation of education for girls and boys, young women and men this year through the 16 Days Campaign.

Under this global theme, the 16 Days Campaign is asking you to join in advancing the right to education and challenging violence, discrimination, and inequity in education at the intersection of gender, race or ethnicity, religion, real or perceived sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and other social identifiers. You can start thinking about what spaces and access to education look like in your community, country, or region. In planning your participation, consider the ways in which militarism affects education, whether in peacetime, during conflict, in refugee and IDP camps, in indigenous territories, in schools and other education settings, or even on the streets. Consider how violence and increased militarism has affected the education of young people in countries that have recently experienced different types of armed conflict; how extremism through State and non-State policies and practices have affected the right to education, especially for girls; and how government expenditures on arms and other priorities of militarization set the tone in funding for safe and accessible education for all.

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Posted on October 6, 2015, in Update. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

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